The Brass Ring

Title: The Brass Ring
Author: Bill Maudlin
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Date: 1971
Pages: 275

This book is an autobiography. The author was a political cartoonist during World War II. He tells his story about how he grew up and decided to be a cartoonist.

At an early age he discovered that he could draw well. As a teen-ager there were various businesses that would hire him to draw signs for them. Later on he joined the army to help fight the war against Hitler.

He focused his drawings on what he was seeing during the war. Often it would show the complaints that many of the soldiers had, along with adding some humor to their complaints.

His drawings became extremely popular and he had published several small books filled with his drawings. One of his drawings won him a Pulitzer Prize.

This book is a very interesting book, but is also very graphic in details in certain spots. The description of the war and what is happening at times will be rough for a Christian believer to read. In a few spots there is some foul language used. The largest spot is during a conversation that he has with General George Patton.

If you have been in the military, and especially during a war, you will understand some of the “humor” and the horrors of the war. There is nothing that is Christian or focused on Jesus anywhere in this book. He does not show any signs of any real belief in Jesus. This makes it some difficult reading for a believer.

If you enjoy biographies or stories dealing with war, you may be interested in this book. However, be warned that it is graphic in spots that is not very good for a believer.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s