Code Talker

Title: Code Talker
Author:Chester Nez with Judith Schiess Avila
Pages:296
Date:2011
Publisher:Berkley Books

This is an autobiography by a man, Chester Nez, who was one of the first men to be a code talker during World War II. He was the last living person of the original group of thirty-two code talkers.

During World War II the USA was losing the battle in the Pacific against Japan. The Japanese army was able to crack every code that the USA had used. The Japanese were so good that they were often at a given point before the Americans could get to it.

One man came up with the idea of using Navajo Indians to use their language in as a code. The Navajo language is so difficult to learn that very few people cannot learn it if they did not grow up with it as their primary language.

In his book, Chester talks about his upbringing and how he was forced to learn English. It shows one of the black spots in America’s history of dealing with people in the wrong way. The Indians were treated badly. Although Chester had a very rough upbringing, he learned many things from it that helped him to succeed in the Marines and help America.

The job he had in the Marines was classified top-secret until 1968. He talks of the struggle it was to have this information and not be able to share it with his family during or after the war.

This book does show the horrors of war and the after effects of war.

I do recommend this book to read if you enjoy autobiographies, war stories, and history. There is about 3-4 foul words in the book. There is also a good number of pictures in the book of his life.

It is an easy to read book and makes you feel a part of his life and some of the pains and fears he had.

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